Scotland in Kentucky?

My son and I love to go on adventures! In my current blog series I am exploring some of our trips from the past. Last week, I highlighted our first day at Mammoth Cave National Park. This week we are going to look at the places we stayed near the park, and a wonderful side adventure that we hadn’t planned on.

Where to stay when visiting Mammoth Cave

I’m sure there are several lovely places that you can stay near Mammoth Cave in Kentucky. However, I am very partial to our choice — Glasgow, Kentucky.

I will be honest with you. I chose Glasgow because of the name. I’d wanted to go to Scotland for several years, but just couldn’t justify leaving my young son to go on my own, and I wasn’t about to take him with me and spend hundreds of dollars on a trip that he wouldn’t remember in ten years. So, Glasgow, Kentucky was my compromise! Glasgow does have their own Highland Games, but we were not there for that.

32 Best Glasgow KY images | Glasgow ky, Glasgow, Kentucky

Glasgow is a lovely little town to visit! Along with the wonderful history of the town, it is a beautiful place. The town square is typical small town USA, but what is not to love about that?

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We were there in excellent weather – it was a little cool, but pleasantly so. We were able to walk from our bed and breakfast to the town center in about two minutes, and there was quite a lot to look at, from statues, to lovely scenery, gazebos, and of course the old architecture.

Our bed and breakfast was the lovely Main Street Bed and Breakfast, which is still in operation. It is owned by a different person now– we went in 2012, and it went under new ownership in 2018. From the look of the website, it seems like it was placed in very good hands, and their dog alone makes me want to go back!

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The house was full of period decorations, exposed brick, cast iron fixtures- the works! It was simply gorgeous! Gabriel and I stayed in one of their smaller rooms with a private bath, and it was beautiful and spacious!

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The Greer Room

I was so pleased with the room! But that wasn’t even the best part! There was a lovely sitting room that was cozy and quiet.

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The breakfast was also lovely, but I won’t dwell too much on that since it is under new ownership, and I don’t have first hand experience with their cooking.

The kitchen was also an experience with decorative pieces everywhere, and a very inviting atmosphere.

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One very cool thing about the bed and breakfast was their private “cabin” of sorts. We didn’t stay there, obviously, but the owner showed it to us because it was vacant at the time we arrived. It offers a bit more privacy, and it has its own little porch. However, it is only a few steps away from the main house, so the walk to breakfast is possibly even shorter than coming downstairs from the Greer Room where we stayed.

I highly recommend both Glasgow AND Main Street B & B!

Unforeseen Surprise

Our second day at Mammoth Cave was filled with another tour of the main cavern as well as a walk through the museum, which was both informative and interactive – perfect for a young one (and his mom).

However, the coolest part of the day was talk with the rangers, of course! I have the utmost respect for these intelligent and caring individuals who ALWAYS made our trips more exciting.

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Gabriel got sworn in as a junior ranger of Mammoth Cave National Park, and then he had his second badge.

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Yet another wonderful thing about the rangers is that they love talking to the children who get the badges.  When the ranger found out we were returning home that day, she asked if we were going to the Lincoln’s Birthplace National Historic Site, which was on the way back to Indianapolis. She even gave me a tip on a scenic route that was faster than the interstate… and prettier. And boy was she right! Unfortunately since I was driving and Gabriel was only six, I don’t have any pictures of the drive, but if you’re headed north from Mammoth Cave, definitely take the 357 to Hodgenville, Kentucky! Green fields dotted with white sheep and stunningly red tobacco barns followed us all the way there. For the first time in my life I understood why people voluntarily lived in Kentucky. 🙂

Lincoln’s Birthplace National Historic Site is very beautiful! A hidden gem, it is lusciously green with wonderful hiking trails. We didn’t get to do much of that because we’d already had a full day before we got there, however, I would love to go back and look at their sunken gardens. Had I known about it before-hand, we would have stayed an extra day so that we could spend more time in Hodgenville.

The big “claim to fame” of the historic site is the monument with a replica of the cabin where Lincoln was born. It isn’t much to speak of on the inside, but the outside is very beautiful. There are 56 steps leading up into the monument that represent each of the years Lincoln was alive, and there are several references to the number 16 since Lincoln was the sixteenth President.

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In the end, Gabriel got a new badge, and we had a lovely stop partway on our trip home!

Come back next week we we jump forward in time to our trip to the Grand Canyon!


If you’re new to the blog, check out the other blogs in this series: 

St. Louis, Missouri 

Kid-venture 2: Mammoth Cave

Or check out some of my other blogs about my other travels! Here are a few of my favorites:

The Healing Balm of Ireland

I found my soul’s home in Glendalough

“You stayed WHERE?” And Other Things People Say to Solo Travelers.

Igoumenitsa to Meteora – the unknown beauty of Greece

Mini-Vaca in the USA

Kid-venture 2: Mammoth Cave

After a successful trip with the boy (to St. Louis, Missouri), I felt very empowered to take my young son on more adventures. The park ranger at The Gateway Arch National Park was monumentally important in determining the trajectory for all of our trips from that point out.

Gabriel wanted more junior ranger badges!

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Junior Ranger program and you have small kids, I highly suggest doing this with your children. When visiting National Parks, Historic Sites, National Shorelines, etc, visit the ranger station and your child will get an activity book to fill out while exploring the area. The workbooks are age adjusted, so the activities for preschoolers are much less intense than the ones for older elementary children. It’s a great way to learn about the park, and the park rangers get totally stoked to swear-in the kids. Every park we’ve been to, the rangers stop whatever they are doing to help kids– even at one park they “fought” over who got to swear Gabriel in that day.  They are wonderful, wonderful people!

Mammoth

Being a teacher has many positives and negatives, but one of the positives is that I have breaks from work when my son has breaks from school… for the most part. And, in central Indiana we have a modified schedule where we have multiple two-week breaks: two weeks in October, two weeks in December, two weeks in March/April. My school does something slightly different now, but at the time of this trip, we had two weeks in October- and so we looked for National Parks that we could drive to pretty easily.

Gabriel decided that his next adventure should be Mammoth Cave in Kentucky, just 3 1/2 hours from where we live. We decided to go over our fall break since the tree colors would be pretty on the drive and in the park.

On the first day of our trip, we started off early and went straight to the park. We got there in time to go on a tour of the main cave. There is a small fee to go on the guided tours, but it is well worth it for the vast knowledge of the park rangers.

There are a plethora of tour options from the very tame, where you walk on well-lit paths that are basically paved and accessible to everyone, to the extremely intense, where you are crawling on your belly and need head-lamps. I believe they even have zip-lining now!  We took the basic tour of the main cavern since my son was still quite young, just six years old.

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Entrance to the main cavern – note the park ranger on the far bottom right for scale

At that age, Gabriel soaked up every. single. word. the ranger uttered. He instructed me what I should write down in the activity book, and he made sure that I kept track of the different uses for the caves over the years.

Some of the great facts we learned:

  • It is the longest system of underground caves in the entire world
  • Originally it was thought to be several different systems that were eventually connected through further exploration
  • Portions of the cave are still unexplored and underwater
  • Evidence of Native American habitation has been found in multiple portions of the cave
  • For a time it was used as a tuberculosis hospital
  • Discoveries are still being made
  • Some animals discovered in the cave (insects) have completely translucent skin because of the complete lack of light (Gabriel’s favorite fact)

Park rules prohibit flash photography in the cave, and this was 2012, so I probably had an iPhone 3 that I was using as a camera. 🙂  Here are a few pictures that are less awful than the rest.

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The slope down into the cave

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It’s difficult to describe how massive the cave is– the shadow on the left is about four times bigger than the actual person that gives some kind of scope.

One of the coolest part of the tour we went on was that once we had walked around for a while and looked at the various sites, the ranger warned us and then turned out all of the lights in the cave. I have never known complete darkness like that. I had my hand right in front of my eyes, and couldn’t see anything – not even the movement of my hand. If it makes sense, it was even darker than when I close my eyes! The lights were only out for a few brief moments, but it was nothing like I’d ever experienced before.

After our tour, we hiked on several trails around the main cave and the visitor center. It was a beautiful cool day, but not so cold that you needed a coat.

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Trees on the trails

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This is the face of a very excited young man. He loved the hiking we got to do!

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“Take a picture of me walking by myself, Mom”

Fall was the right time to visit Kentucky. The leaves on the trees were turning, and it was positively beautiful.

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One of several “sink-hole” cave entrances

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This is his pensive stance

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Like many National Parks, Mammoth Cave has a lodge where you can stay in the park, and they also have several campgrounds for both tents and campers. We chose to stay in nearby Glasgow, Kentucky – but I’ll talk more about that in the next post when I talk about day two of our wonderful time at Mammoth Cave National Park!

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New to the blog?

Check out the first mom/son adventure that my son and I went on: 

Or, check out my adventures in Ireland in 1997 by starting here: 

How about my trip to Italy and Greece with some of my students? Start here: